Posted by: Eric Lefevre-Ardant | August 12, 2009

Meet Garrett, Guru

“I’ve been involved with agile development since the inception of the term. I’m interested in new thinking, not the same old stuff repackaged.”

Garrett has been in software development and on the leading edge for over 20 years. He’s quick to follow current trends, not because he’s trendy, but because he appreciates new ideas. He’s published three books, the last one on agile development.

Garrett might not attend many sessions from the normal program. Instead, he will probably hang out at the Open Jam stage and talk with fellow agilists. He is also looking forward to chatting over a beer at the end of day with some people he had met at Agile 2008. He will also check the program of the research stage at the last minute, as it will probably contain papers that are relevant for his next book. Finally, he wants to hear about what might come after Agile, so he will try to talk with Brian Marick and others about Artisanal Retro-Futurism crossed with Team-Scale Anarcho-Syndicalism. Let’s stop calling it “agile”, a session by Bas Vodde and Steven Mak could be interesting, too.

Does this story sound familiar to you? Garrett is a persona, a fictional character used to focus parts of the conference. Come and meet like-minded participants at Agile 2009 Conference. And check out the top sessions at the conference for Garrett.

Posted by: Eric Lefevre-Ardant | August 10, 2009

Meet Peter, Programmer

“I’d like to get a better handle on test driven development and refactoring.”

Peter’s company has just started using agile development. While he’s been a developer for a long time, he’s not used agile practices like TDD. Peter is coming to the conference to learn, a bit like an intense training session. He wants to learn the basics and to see how other developers practice their craft.

The many hands-on sessions are high priority to Peter (Ruby Kata and Sparring by Micah Martin, Coding Dojo: Enhancing Legacy Code by Guillaume Tardif, Eric Lefevre-Ardant, Clean Code Clinic: Refactoring Fest with Naresh Jain, Ugly Code vs Clean Code: A/B Comparison of Legacy/Test-Driven Implementations by Patrick Wilson-Welsh, Corey Haines, TDD Clinic: C++ with James Grenning and Bas Vodde, Growing Object-Oriented Software, Guided by Tests by Steve Freeman). He is also very interested in this thing called Continuous Integration and plans to get a headstart from Continuous Integration: Your New Best Friend by Howard Deiner, and then from Build Engineer Bootcamp: Builds As Code by Paul Julius and Jeffrey Fredrick. He will also try to watch Programming with the Stars and maybe even peek at the coding in progress at Live Aid.

Does this story sound familiar to you? Peter is a persona, a fictional character used to focus parts of the conference. Come and meet like-minded participants at Agile 2009 Conference. And check out the top sessions at the conference for Peter.

Posted by: Eric Lefevre-Ardant | August 7, 2009

Meet Patricia, Project Manager

“I really love the sensible way agile project management works. It’s challenging describing my agile team’s accomplishments in traditional project management terms – the way my company still expects.”

Patricia is a seasoned project manager. She prefers agile development to her old attempts to force teams to conform to an overly prescriptive plan. But, her stakeholders still ask for the same predictability and schedule commitments. On her agile team she’s considered a ScrumMaster, but she still has lots of old project management responsibilities that don’t seem to fit into that ScrumMaster role.

At the conference, Patricia is planning to attend New Approaches to Risk Management with David Anderson and The Invisible Project Manager with Mack Adams. She feels that Painless Iteration Planning (Julie Chickering, Ken Clyne) might help her too.

Does this story sound familiar to you? Patricia is a persona, a fictional character used to focus parts of the conference. Come and meet like-minded participants at Agile 2009 Conference. And check out the top sessions at the conference for Patricia.

Posted by: Eric Lefevre-Ardant | August 5, 2009

Meet Deanna, User Interface Designer

“It’s difficult to keep up with all the design work I need to do to support the team in the next iteration. I don’t get to work with users as much as I’d like to.”

Deanna’s company is just starting to work with agile development. Her other team members that just came back from agile training have no idea what she should be doing and when. In the mean time she’s supposed to be designing UI for various parts of screens that appear in the next sprint’s stories. Deanna would like help understanding how a healthy UX practice fits inside a tight agile lifecycle.

Deanna is eager to hear Jared M. Spool talking about The Dawning of the Age of Experience. Since his keynote is going to be attended by the entire crowd of participants, she hopes people with other roles in a project will understanded her work better. Deanna is also looking forward to Hands-on Guerilla User Testing, a talk by Luke Barrett and Marc Mcneill. Agile User Experience Design Emergent Practices by Jeff Patton seems to address her concerns directly, too.

Does this story sound familiar to you? Deanna is a persona, a fictional character used to focus parts of the conference. Come and meet like-minded participants at Agile 2009 Conference. And check out the top sessions at the conference for Deanna.

Posted by: Eric Lefevre-Ardant | August 4, 2009

Les Cast Codeurs mention Agile 2009

Fritzi Scheff demonstrating Magnavox for Fifth Liberty Loan in New York City, 1895 Tell your French (and Java) speaking friends! Les Cast Codeurs, a podcast in French dedicated to all things Java has released their episode 7 just a couple of days ago.
The Agile 2009 conference is mentioned around minute 34. The speakers gave a selection of sessions that will appeal to the fans of the Java language. The text is also entirely in the show notes.

Posted by: Eric Lefevre-Ardant | August 3, 2009

Meet Marcus, Program Manager

“I’d like to learn how to manage a portfolio of software products using agile concepts. My concerns seem bigger and more complex than user stories and backlogs can handle.”

Marcus is responsible for a group of closely related software products, each with its own manager. While the product teams that have started to use agile methods are performing well, he’s still got big problems to deal with, including: planning across products with architectural dependencies, making and keeping commitments to sales and marketing, being responsive to existing customers, and reacting quickly to his company’s inevitable strategy changes. Peter wonders if agile thinking offers some strategies he can use.

Marcus is looking forward to Johanna Rothman’s talk Increase Your Capacity and Finish Projects: Manage the Project Portfolio. He will also be present at Take No Prisoners: How a Venture Capital Group Does Scrum, a session by Jeff Sutherland and Igor Altman.

Does this story sound familiar to you? Marcus is a persona, a fictional character used to focus parts of the conference. Come and meet like-minded participants at Agile 2009 Conference. And check out the top sessions at the conference for Marcus.

Posted by: Eric Lefevre-Ardant | August 2, 2009

What to see in Chicago when the sessions are over?

Chicago by Bert I have personally been to Chicago only once before, ten years ago, on a business trip. In the middle of winter, I didn’t get to see much.

So I’m grateful to James Grenning for recommending highlights of the city. He took in account proximity to the conference venue, so this is particularly relevant to out-of-towners.

From experience, I know little time will be available outside the conference. So I get I’ll just walk down the Magnificent Mile. Plus visit a couple of Jazz venues. And go on top of the John Hancock Building. Time permitting, that is!

Posted by: Eric Lefevre-Ardant | July 31, 2009

Build your program with iCal

Support for iCalUsing an iCal-compatible calendar application?

Then you’ll like our support of iCal.

When browsing the program online, you’ll notice little calendar-shaped icons. On most systems, this will open your calendar application and add the session to your agenda.

Don’t have a calendar app yet? The Mozilla Foundation has a couple of them that work on most platforms. And don’t forget that Mac OS X comes with a calendar application.

Using an online calendar?

You are not out of luck. Most of them can import iCal files. For example, on Google Calendar, in the Other Calendars box, click Add / Add by URL, then paste the URL from the calendar icon. Note that it will create a new agenda for each session.

Another option is to save the iCal file to your computer, then import it to Google Calendar (Add / Import calendar). This will create a new meeting in your usual agenda. You’ll have to repeat that for each session, though.

Posted by: Eric Lefevre-Ardant | July 30, 2009

Meet Carlos, Internal Coach

“I’m helping in my organization’s initiative to adopt agile development. I’d like advice in becoming a better coach for my company.”

Carlos has been recently tapped to help with his company’s effort to adopt agile development. He conducts internal agile trainings and acts as a ScrumMaster for two internal teams. He acts as an internal consultant for several others. He often doesn’t feel seasoned enough with agile development to be giving the advice he’s often called to give.

Carlos is grateful to see a session called Top Ten Tips for Agile Coaches, presented by Rachel Davies and Liz Sedley. Since he wants to see what happened in other situations, he is also looking forward to J. B. Rainsberger’s XP: My Greatest Misses 2000-2009. Another interesting one could also be Brian Marick’s Eight Guiding Values.

Does this story sound familiar to you? Carlos is a persona, a fictional character used to focus parts of the conference. Come and meet like-minded participants at Agile 2009 Conference. And check out the top sessions at the conference for Carlos.

Posted by: Eric Lefevre-Ardant | July 28, 2009

Meet Billy, Business Analyst

“Working with user stories is nothing like the analysis work I’ve done in the past. I’m re-learning how to do my job.”

Billy works on an agile team. He’s an experienced analyst trying to understand how he should be doing his job in a new Agile environment. He’s struggling to determine if his old skills of writing use cases and creating workflow models are still useful.

Billy knows that Alistair Cockburn has been instrumental in popularizing Use Cases, so he is very interested in his sessions, such as Nano-Incremental Development, or Elephant Carpaccio. However, his priority is to attend Agile Grows up: The Agile Business Analyst, by Steve Adolph. User Stories for Agile Requirements, a session with Mike Cohn, looks good too.

Does this story sound familiar to you? Billy is a persona, a fictional character used to focus parts of the conference. Come and meet like-minded participants at Agile 2009 Conference. And check out the top sessions at the conference for Billy.

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »

Categories